Onwards and Upwards

Corporal Si Longworth

Sergeant Si Longworth

Sergeant Si Longworth is one of 38 trained British Army photographers.  He left a career in aviation to pursue his passion for photography; capturing everything that military life has to offer. He has recently returned from Afghanistan where he was the Task Force Helmand Photographer.

It does feel a little strange writing this blog. Not because I am at 44,000 feet. Not because it’s being written on a shiny new Apple MacBook Air which I have borrowed from my boss. Not even because said laptop is just working seamlessly which is the other side of the coin from what I am used to trying to work on. All these excuses could account for why this is a strange blog to write, but of course they would all be incorrect.

Your precious time will tell

The reason is simply because I haven’t put the proverbial pen to paper in such a long time that it feels somewhat alien to me. Not immensely alien you understand. Only as alien as say, using a Canon DSLR for the first time. As you all know, that opportunity knocked on my door last year and within an extremely short period of ‘self-beasting’ I had tamed it and was ready to use that great bit of kit on live jobs for work – (‘Beasting’ is military slang for pushing someone or one’s self to extreme limits).

So, with the same mind-set as I had when I unwrapped the Canon 1DX, I am here to write you another blog. I am hoping that throughout my thousand words or so I have still got the knack of keeping you entertained. Only your precious time will tell.

[Quick read of my last blog to find out where we are in the life of Si_Army_Phot]

Right, lets continue…

… 2014 ended on a high for me for a multitude of differing reasons, some work and some personal, but it all started to ramp up from July onwards.

Ramping up

Work was keeping me busy in Tidworth. The Brigade Headquarters went through a seamless role, and name-change. 1 Mechanized Brigade became 1 Armoured Infantry Brigade under the Future Army Structure. Apart from having to remember to change my file naming structure, I wasn’t really affected by the change.

Jobs continued to roll in. Two in particular caught my eye. The first of which being the Tarleton Trophy with 4 RIFLES. This was an annual inter-company competition, which was first set up by the late Colonel Tarleton.

It is a grueling long distance march across Dartmoor competing in different mini-exercises along the way. I followed several sections as they made their way around the ground and captured the various stages. One of the last events for them was a platoon attack over unforgiving ground. What made this one more interesting from my point of view was the ‘casualty’, which the guys had to deal with whilst coming under attack.

You may or may not know of several companies which are employed by the Armed Forces to act as casualties, creating highly realistic scenarios for the troops. One of these companies, Amputees in Action was being used on this exercise.

The casualty was a woman who had suffered from Meningitis in her adult life and had lost her legs. She had worked for the company part-time for years and [today] she was playing the role of a IED (Improvised Explosive Device) victim who has lost both her legs, and sustained a bullet wound to the chest. I had plenty of time to chat to her, and she said she enjoyed providing realistic training for the troops. Watching scenario after scenario unfold, I found it amazing how soldiers dealt with such realistic trauma.

My hat goes off to all those people who make the choice to help out in realistic training scenarios, even though they must have had to deal with difficult personal circumstances themselves.

An ‘Amputee in Action’ providing realistic and valuable training scenarios to soldiers.

An ‘Amputee in Action’ providing realistic and valuable training scenarios to soldiers.

The second job that provided great imagery spanned a whole week. I deployed to Warminster with Cpl (Now Sgt) Baz Lloyd to assist the Army Engagement Group in gathering up to date imagery of a wide spectrum of training on the Salisbury Plain Training Area.

Working with Baz

Baz and I moved from section attacks, to village clearances, to tank battles across open plains to underslung load training with the Army Air Corps. It was like being a kid in a sweet shop with virtually unlimited golden opportunities to capture the best of what the Army has to offer. Here are just a few of the examples:

A section commander keeps watch over his men during a battle through an urban area.

A section commander keeps watch over his men during a battle through an urban area.

 

A tank crew pause on the plain to assess the battle plan.

A tank crew pause on the plain to assess the battle plan.

 

A Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle on patrol on Salisbury Plain.

A Warrior Armoured Fighting Vehicle on patrol on Salisbury Plain.

 

The Army Air Corps conducting underslung load training with the help of an RAF Chinook.

The Army Air Corps conducting underslung load training with the help of an RAF Chinook.

So the year was going well, but not well enough it seemed, as it was going to get better. The Army decided to promote me. I had managed to get back to Sergeant again and as you can imagine, was very happy about it. I wasn’t able to wear it until I had moved to my next posting location.

Oh the hardship

The Army would hand me the news of where that was likely to be later in the year, but first they were going to send me abroad again. Where this time? I am sure those of you who follow me on twitter already know as I couldn’t really keep it in. That’s right, I was New Zealand-bound with 4 Rifles. Oh the hardship.

There isn’t much I can say about New Zealand (believe it or not) other than what a friendly place it is. I have never experienced such hospitality since I came home to my parents for the first time after I’d completed basic army training. I was there to cover a multinational planning exercise consisting of the following ‘players’ – Singapore, UK, Malaysia, Austrailia and New Zealand (SUMAN).

I managed to make friends with another military photographer whilst over there, an Australian Naval Photographer called Jayson Tuffrey. He was my ‘Ozzy-opposite’ and together we documented most of what went on inside the wire and at times, and with help from a Royal New Zealand Air Force Photographer, a little of went on outside it. For those of you who manage a trip to Wellington, I thoroughly recommend trying to find the secret entrance to ‘Alice’s’ and drinking a copious amount of cocktails from white china teapots. It’s a great way to make friends and get ridiculous bargains on Fujifilm lenses …

Soldiers from the Five-Power Defence Arrangement war game.

Soldiers from the Five-Power Defence Arrangement war game.

 

Jayson, Alex and I discuss Fuji prices.

Jayson, Alex and I discuss Fuji prices.

I got back to find out that in the December I was going to be posted to the Press Office in York. Inevitably, this was going to be a change in pace from what I was used to at Tidworth. Being on the doorstep of a lot of front line troops and having Salisbury Plain as my back garden meant I was never short of an image. I wondered if York would provide me with the same excitement. One thing was for sure, I was thrilled to be posted in the North for the first time in my 19-year career.

Another rooftop

I rounded the photographic year off with the opportunity to capture the Remembrance Parade in London from another rooftop. I simply love the opportunities that being an Army Photographer affords me.

A slightly different view of the parade but a poignant reminder, none the less.

A slightly different view of the parade but a poignant reminder, none the less.

So, that was 2014 more or less wrapped up. As I said, I thought it ended very well… However, I would be lying if I said it ended there. I can assure you that it shifted up yet another gear before the clock struck midnight on December 31.

Baby_Si_Army_Phot

After a long and successful year I was handed a note by ‘Mrs Si_Army_Phot’ and informed that 2015 would be even better.

In 2015, the world was going to welcome Baby_Si_Army_Phot. The year doesn’t get a much better end than that.

So now here I am, early March. Twenty odd-jobs-in having already (to name only a few) travelled UK-wide capturing environmental portraits, been flown around Yorkshire with the RAF capturing aerial images, covered two Royal visits, covered the testing of equipment at the Jaguar test track for the Bloodhound Supersonic Car, and now, on a jet heading to a Russian-Estonian border town for a few days to grab some topical news.

With such a strong start, I ask you… where is 2015 going to go from here?

Stick with me and no doubt you will soon find out…

 

Read Si’s other blogs here: Life Through a Lens…

Desert soldiering: Exercise Jebel Dagger in Jordan

Sapper Eddie Joseph

Sapper Eddie Joseph

 Sapper Eddie Joseph is an Army Reservist with 131 Independent Commando Royal Engineers based in Birmingham. A heating engineer by trade, the 25-year old is currently serving on attachment with 131’s paired regular unit, 24 Commando Engineer Regiment. Sapper Joseph is 8 months into a year-long engagement and has just returned from providing close engineer support to 40 Commando Royal Marines on Exercise Jebel Dagger in Jordan. He describes his experiences of desert soldiering in this blog.

 

We reached our desert placement late at night and established a harbour with the vehicles.

As dawn broke I surveyed the stark, barren landscape that we were to inhabit. The camp had been sited on a flat plain surrounded by jagged, rocky terrain. Gusts of wind blew up great clouds of dust that nearly choked us, and found its way into all our kit. Everything smelt burned and blasted.

0600 reveille and we set about putting up tents for the marines prior to their arrival. Containers packed with supplies arrived throughout the day and night. This work, along with the water tank and force protection, continued beneath the hot desert sun. The temperature dropped dramatically at night and as we patrolled the perimeter our night vision goggles gave the desolate landscape an eerie glow.

The flat ground contrasting with the jebel country behind.

The flat ground contrasting with the jebel country behind.

 

The flat ground on which we build our camp.

The flat ground on which we build our camp.


I took stock of our surroundings. Within a few days dust and rock had become a proper military camp: a hive of activity. The British Military, with its ethos of hard work and good organisation, had arrived.

The camp, which had begun as a linear vehicle harbour, had expanded rapidly. 18×24’ tents sprang up day and night like mushrooms. It would peak as a 1000-man base enclosed by hundreds of metres of dannert coil and barbed wire that we had erected in the oven heat, smashing in pickets before lifting the razor wire on. We built shower frames and dug out the drainage.

One of the wire fences we built.

One of the wire fences we built.



By now the Royal Marines had arrived and the field kitchen, providing fresh meals, was established. We began to get some respite from the engineering tasks. Range days were started. Instructors who’d studied in the jungles of Asia taught us how to read signs and spoor left by enemy movement. We learnt ground signs awareness, engine maintenance and vehicle recovery in a desert environment.

We spent our evenings playing risk and poker by torchlight. When Arabic lessons became available I eagerly signed up, keen to expand my cultural awareness. I set upon the locals who worked on camp with my broken Gulf tongue, missing no opportunity to ask  them ‘how are you?’ and greeting them with a cheery ‘peace be with you’. They soon became a lot harder to find!

Mountain training with the mountain leaders.

Mountain training with the mountain leaders.

 

Taking a rest between duties.

Taking a rest between duties.

Our section provided demonstrations for medic training and mine clearance lessons. We used our own time to keep fit, venturing out into the surrounding area on long distance runs and hill reps. On one occasion we happened upon a Jordanian army training village. We sat down to rest in a bullet ridden building as the flaming sun set over the desert, an experience one does not come across often.

The camp held a sports afternoon before a day of operational stand down (OSD). We played games of football and volleyball, which I am duly obliged to report that my section expertly won.  Then, for OSD we were taken to Petra – a city literally carved from sandstone cliffs. It was a fantastic place with monuments rising up the sides of the canyon. It began life as Nabataean tombs, and has since played host to Romans, venturesome Crusaders – and now some portly tourists.

Bulk desalination and purification of water at Aqeba.

Bulk desalination and purification of water at Aqeba.


The next morning we packed our kit, ready to rotate with the section manning the water point at Aqaba port. The water point, next to the crystal clear waters of the Red Sea, made a welcome change from the desert. By pumping seawater through a series of filters and adding a dosed amount of chlorine we could produce potable water for the base in Al Qwarah.

I spent the time between checks exercising in our makeshift gym. It passed quickly. Then I was called back to participate in a vertical assault course with two fellow sappers.  We were trained by mountain leaders to ascend and descend steep faces and cliffs with weapons and equipment, Commando skills we’d previously learned but which demand constant practice.

We were taught how to make improvised stretchers like the clove hitch or roscoe, so that we can evacuate casualties from remote areas. At night I could hear gunfire as 40 Commando practiced live firing in the distance. I remember sitting on a rocky outcrop waiting to abseil down the cliff, watching tracers and flares going off across the desert, lighting up the sky like fireworks.

The following day we embarked upon a navigation exercise around the surrounding area, yomping up to heights of 1300 metres. At each high point we tackled section tests. Stances included judging distance, map reading and medical training that tested patient care and evacuation technique. On some evenings the cultural advisor gave us briefs on subjects such as the formation and history of the Middle East and the Arab Spring.

We then moved into our second special-to-arm package that consisted mainly of demolitions and urban combat training. We spent the days practising compound clearance, advancing our skill level and using explosive charges to gain entry into otherwise difficult to attack buildings. Concentration and attention to detail were vital.  Nothing compares to the feeling of a breaching charge exploding a couple of metres away from you as you prepare to assault a building.

 

Another amazing Jordanian sunset.

Another amazing Jordanian sunset.



The temperature had begun to fall dramatically at night, partially due to the altitude of the camp. Our nightly showers became colder and colder. Then, our second OSD day signified the approach of the final few weeks. Our stand-down took place at a hotel in Aqaba. It’s always the simple things you miss, and we had a few hours to enjoy a resort with proper showers, porcelain toilets, and a jacuzzi on the roof. I returned to camp that night with a very much-needed haircut (I’d begun to look like some sort of Bedouin Rastafarian) and some good memories.

The following days were spent building a culvert: a pipe that would redirect flash flood water from a road. Once that was done we drove an hour north, to a training camp where we worked like Trojans to build a protective fencing in what felt like record time. At night we told stories around the fire and slept beneath the stars.  It was soon time to return to Al Quwayiyah, and as we returned in convoy we were treated to some fantastic sunset views out over the vast mountain range.

After living with my fellow troops in such a close knit community I felt a sense of camaraderie with my colleagues that’s as old as military life itself. On a personal level I feel privileged to know that I have people around me in 24 Commando who I trust and respect, and whose friendship will last a lifetime.

Remembrance Sunday in the Jordanian desert.

Remembrance Sunday in the Jordanian desert.



On Remembrance Day we went to a nearby cairn upon which a cross had been built. The padre read sermons and the flag bearers stood proud on the higher ground. The post sounded and we took our silence. Remembrance Day parade is a time of reflection for me, the tradition, the fallen, the pride of the service and the country we serve. Around the world people were united in prayer and remembrance.

Our rotation on guard arrived and we took our posts at each gate. Working the laborious ‘four hours on, four hours off’, we ensured that the security of our camp was maintained. Night passed quietly with only the occasional hound – the wraiths of the desert – to usher away as they came to root through the bins.

Finally, we sat around our kit with nothing but the sand and mountains left, just as it had been when we arrived. I thought back over the many experiences I’d had. We piled on to troop carrying vehicles and headed to Titin camp near the port.  There we waited for RAF transport home on the big grey bird of freedom.

Hot showers, Wi-Fi and cooked meals were welcomed, as was the first proper bed in two months – even though it was a near-falling-apart bunk bed.
As the hour drew closer to the flight my anticipation grew. A cold beer and the UK’s unique weather system beckoned.  We got on transport to the King Hussein International Airport and the journey back began, with a 5 hour flight followed by another 4 hours by bus. Soon we were a world away from the sands and heat of Jordan and back in the familiar company of rain and grass. It had been an enthralling escapade and I was happy to be home – but I couldn’t help wondering what adventure awaited us next.

“Our deeds still travel with us from afar,

And what we have been makes us what we are.”

― George Eliot

 

Read more blogs from Sapper Joseph

Tropical storms, abandoned tattoos and the South Shore Serenade

Musician Lance Corporal Paul Dove talks about working in Bermuda as part of a Corps of Army Music training team.

 

Army Musician Lance Corporal Paul Dove.

Army Musician Lance Corporal Paul Dove.

Bermuda. A tiny island located in the North Atlantic covering an area of 20.6 miles2 with a coastline of just 75 miles. Home to Bermuda shorts, whistling tree frogs, pink sand beaches, the Bermuda onion, the world’s smallest drawbridge and, for the next 18 nights, a Corps of Army Music (CAMUS) Short Term Training Team (STTT).

The team was made up of personnel drawn from all over CAMUS and included Warrant Officer Class One Bandmaster Matt Simons, Drum Major Alistair Smith, Musician Mattias Andersson and me, Lance Corporal Paul Dove.

CAMUS in Bermuda?

Bermuda has always held close ties with the UK as a member of the Commonwealth. In particular, The Bermuda Regiment is closely linked to the Lincolnshire Regiment and its successor The Royal Anglian Regiment, specifically the 2nd Battalion, who often provide training in various guises.

CAMUS provide STTT’s in direct support of the Army’s core purposes of ‘contingent capability for deterrence and defence’ and ‘overseas engagement and capacity building’ as outlined under the current Army 2020 plan.

Our team was in Bermuda to support and help train The Band and Corps of Drums of the Bermuda Regiment, the ceremonial face of The Bermuda Regiment. In the same way that Army Reserve Bands are required to complete an annual camp, our deployment was to coincide with the Band’s annual two-week camp.

Drum Major Alastair Smith with the current and potential Drum Majors of the Bermuda Regiment Band and Corps of Drums.

Drum Major Alastair Smith with the current and potential Drum Majors of the Bermuda Regiment Band and Corps of Drums.

On the 26th of September after a seven hour flight from London Gatwick, the team touched down at Bermuda airport at 2200 hours local time. We were met by Major Dwight Robinson, Director of Music of the Bermuda Regiment and a former resident at Kneller Hall having graduated from the three year Bandmasters course held there in 2003.  Accompanying him was the Band Sergeant Major, Warrant Officer Class Two James Van-Lowe.  Serving over 30 years in the Regiment Band, WO2 Van-Lowe was no stranger to UK military music having completed his Band Sergeants’ course at the Royal Marines School of Music in Deal, Kent, in 1986.

After settling in at Warwick Camp and spending a day acclimatising at Bermuda’s famous Horseshoe Bay, we eagerly awaited the arrival of the Band and Drums members. Indeed, when they arrived, there were a few more familiar faces, Cpl Paul Smith and LCpl Kallan Thomas who had both completed training at the Royal Military School of Music, Kneller Hall.

Within the first few days we were introduced to the Regimental Sergeant Major WO1 Gavin Rayner and the Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Colonel Michael Foster-Brown, a serving British Army officer originally from The Royal Green Jackets (now The Rifles) Regiment. They were both extremely pleased to have us on the Island and made us feel very welcome.

Within hours of the Band starting their annual camp, I found myself on an engagement at the Bermuda Cathedral in Hamilton with the rest of the STTT.  The event was to commemorate the start of WW1 and pay respects to the fallen and in particular, fallen Bermudians who had served in both world wars with the British Army.

Throughout the two weeks, the team also took part in the South Shore Serenade each day. This involved marching out of the Camp and performing to the morning and evening traffic on one of Bermuda’s busiest roads and, on occasion, marching round the local residential areas in Warwick.

Me working with pupils of the Bermuda Youth Orchestra at Cedarbridge Academy.

Me working with pupils of the Bermuda Youth Orchestra at Cedarbridge Academy.

One of the most rewarding engagements we took part in was at Cedarbridge Academy. Here we helped the Band strengthen its relationship with the Bermuda Youth Orchestra, a source of possible recruits for the Band. The team spent some time with their individual sections, instructing on basic musicianship principles. This also helped to show some of the Regiment Band members how to run sectional rehearsals, a skill that would come in useful.

The Band also performed at the Bermuda Police Service (BPS) parade, marching through Hamilton to celebrate the Service’s 135th anniversary and also publicising the upcoming Tattoo performance.

Preparing for the tattoo

One of the aims of the next couple of weeks for the Band and Drums was to prepare for the BPS Tattoo. This was to be an extravaganza involving a massed Bands performance with the Royal Bahamas Police Force Band, The Somerset Brigade Band (a band primarily made from ex-Bermuda Regiment Band members) and the Bermuda Islands Pipe Band.  Before all this though, the STTT were required to assist in designing a display for the Bermuda Regiment Band.

Rehearsals for the BPS Tatto at the Bermuda National Sports Centre

Rehearsals for the BPS Tatto at the Bermuda National Sports Centre

 

Musn Mattias Andersson performing at the Bermuda National Sports Centre.

Musn Mattias Andersson performing at the Bermuda National Sports Centre.

Drum Major Smith took charge of designing a display for the Band and Drums and rehearsals were plentiful and included lessons on band drill, instrument deportment and musical rehearsals on the parade ground. Drum Major Smith also put some of the members of the Band and Drums through their paces with some basic Drum Major tuition. The Band and Drums have traditionally attended the Drum Major course held at The Army School of Ceremonial in Catterick and after Drum Major Smith’s lessons, there was no shortage of volunteers.

WO1 (BM) Simons, assisted Major Robinson with rehearsals on the Tattoo music which included challenging pieces for the Band such as the 1812 Overture, and Stevie Wonder’s Sir Duke.  In amongst these rehearsals, and in between the Band’s military training, the team delivered lessons on music theory and basic musicianship principles, an experience that I found quite daunting as I had not previously taught music theory to a large audience. However, the Band was very receptive to our efforts and enjoyed our sessions with them.

During these rehearsals, we received a visit from the Governor of Bermuda, His Excellency, the Honourable George Fergusson and Bermuda’s Premier, Mr Michael Dunkley. They spoke to members of the team and Band and were very appreciative of all our efforts over the last few days and looked forward to seeing the finished product.

Team Building with a bit of football and volley ball

Team Building with a bit of football and volley ball

One of the other goals of the Band and Drum’s annual camp was to develop unit cohesion. To that end, there were several team building exercises laid on throughout the two weeks. Fortunately, we were invited along to all of them and they included golf, bowling, a production of The Pirates of Penzance and my personal favourite, kayaking along the coastline in the North Atlantic Ocean.

Bermudian weather

To quote Band member Sgt Marie Trott, ‘If you don’t like the weather in Bermuda, just wait ten minutes!’ Unfortunately the weather took a turn for the worse with the arrival of tropical storm ‘Fay’ which battered the Island and sadly resulted in the BPS Tattoo being cancelled.

During this time, The Bermuda Regiment was ‘embodied’ by the Government to help cope with the post-storm relief effort. This ‘embodiment’ was in direct support of the Regiment’s mission to: ‘Support the civil authority with the security of Bermuda, its people, property, livelihood and interests in order to maintain normality.’

Several members of the Band were also recalled to support the relief effort and the sense of professionalism and team spirit shown by the Regiment at this time was very impressive.

So our time in Bermuda had come to an end. Before the Band went their separate ways, we all said our farewells and exchanged gifts. Major Dwight Robinson was hugely appreciative of what the CAMUS STTT had provided to his Band and hopes to host another team in the near future. Thanks must go to Major Dwight Robinson and all members of The Bermuda Regiment that made our trip possible.

As this blog is being written, hurricane Gonzalo has just made it to the UK after battering its way through Bermuda. The STTT would just like to take this opportunity to say that we hope that our colleagues in The Bermuda Regiment are safe and continue to perform admirably.

You’re in the Army now: Passing Out

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

My name is Andrew Vaughan, I am 26 years old and this is my story so far. I have just finished my fourteenth week of Phase 1 training at ATR Winchester where I hope to go on to join the Royal Artillery.

 

Week 14

Monday

Today marked the start of practising the parade itself with the other troops on the square. We did this in our barrack dress which combined with the extreme heat is killer! We’ve also started paying extra attention to bulling our shoes, as shoe inspections will be coming up to make sure ours are up to standard for our big day.

The basic format of the parade was covered today and the RSM made sure everyone knew what was happening.

In the evening, we showed our skit video to our Troop Staff whilst we ordered dominos in. We spent a lot of time on the skit and it was received very well by all (it was hilarious!).

Tuesday

Today was a sad day in one respect. It was our Troop Commanders last day and another would stand in for him for our parade. He bid us farewell and wished us luck for the future. I hope I’ll see him again somewhere down the line.

The prize winners were announced today and their part of the parade to collect their awards was practised and refined. The whole parade is beginning to take shape, the finish line is in sight.

Wednesday

Flaws and mistakes were tweaked today up to the point that the RSM noticed a huge improvement. We’re so close to passing out now, there’s a huge buzz of excitement in the air!

The recruits on parade.

The recruits on parade.

Thursday

Today was a big day for me for two reasons. One being that it was my last full day and night here at Winchester. The second, it’s my birthday!

Today we handed back in our issued kit, cleaned our rifles, had a shoe inspection (which after a week of solid bulling went well), had a No 2 inspection (which after a week of ironing and threading also went well) and finally did more parade practice on the square. We’re now at a decent level according to the RSM which has boosted our confidence and none of us can wait for tomorrow! I spent the rest of my birthday enjoying my last night in Winchester – by taking part in a section attack on the rest of the troop with head torches and water pistols. A brilliant end to my 26th!

Friday

So the day had finally come. 14 weeks of mud, sweat and tears. The amount I’ve learnt and the amount I’ve grown since I’ve been here is astonishing and it has all led to today.

Recruit Andrew Vaughan

Recruit Andrew Vaughan 14 weeks ago before he started

We got into our barrack dress so not to ruin our No 2s and made our way to the square to do a final run through with the band. The band playing in the background got the adrenaline flowing and the goose bumps going, the drum kept us in perfect step. With our final practise over with we got back to the block and got changed into our No 2s whilst our friends and families began to arrive.

We checked each other over and when convinced we all looked the part, marched over to the square and got ready. The speaker announced us on and our pass out parade began. The band playing coupled with the sound of our loved ones cheering us on was an unbelievably overwhelming feeling and one I won’t forget. We performed our pass out perfectly and when all was over we were marched back off the square as soldiers!

We got changed into our civilian suits, said goodbye and thank you to our staff, met up with our families and bid farewell to ATR Winchester. Thankfully all of 2 Troop have come to Phase 2 together but I’d like to give a huge thank you to my training team. It’s been emotional!

 

Visit Recruit Vaughan’s page and read about his journey

Find out about joining the Army

Find out about ATR Winchester

You’re in the Army now: arms drill

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

My name is Andrew Vaughan, I am 25 years old and this is my story so far. I have just finished my thirteenth week of Phase 1 training at ATR Winchester where I hope to go on to join the Royal Artillery.

Week 13

Monday

Today we began learning arms drill in preparation of our impending pass out parade. Straight away we realised that arms drill is a lot harder than we first thought, with bruises quickly emerging on our hands and shoulders!

We spent most of the day covering basics such as standing at ease, attention and sloping/changing arms. Afterwards we went to the storeroom for our final No 2 Dress fitting. Once satisfied our No 2 Dress fitted, we brought them back to the block to begin to prep them for next weeks parade.

We finished the day preparing for our presentations that we would deliver regarding the Royal Artillery – our chosen cap badge.

Tuesday

We began the day with functional skills, which covered all we had learnt over the 13 weeks. Afterwards we got changed and headed to PT which was a swimming test. The test was the same as our initial – treading water for two minutes followed by six lengths, only this time it was after quite a hard warm up and wearing military kit that weighed us down. After all our training we all managed to pass without any dramas. I even jumped off the top board without hesitation – a small feat which I couldn’t complete at the start of the process and a testament to my development here.

Recruits from ATR Winchester on arms drill

I’m not here, but these are some recruits from ATR Winchester on drill

After PT we spent the rest of the day learning more arms drill, which is confusing a fair few of us at the moment!

Wednesday

In the morning we had the COs inspection and after many hours of hard graft we managed to get the block gleaming. The inspection went well and we breathed a sigh of relief.

We’d packed our bergens the night before and took them to PT ready for our six mile TAB. We had to pass this to pass out and I was very nervous. Although hard work we all pulled together as a troop and apart from one, we all managed to pass. The recruit who didn’t retook the test and passed second time around as well.

We finished the day with more arms drill, learning the final movements before going over all of them until perfected.

Thursday

A couple of financial briefs today, followed by swimming PT and then arms drill practise with the other troops so that we can all get the movements in time for pass out. As it stands, we need more work!

Cadets from ATR Winchester on swimming PT

Recruits from ATR Winchester on swimming PT

Friday

Today we delivered our presentations on the Royal Artillery including when we formed, early battles we’ve been involved in and our influence in modern warfare today. Our presentation was well received and our hard work paid off.

We had strength and conditioning for PT which was brutal! Circuits in the sun which is always a winning combo! More arms drill in the evening to brush up our skills including changing arms on the march.

Saturday and Sunday

This weekend was spent in camp, brushing up on admin and enjoying the last weekend I’ll have here. Our troop spent our time in the NAAFI reflecting on our time here and pondering what was next for us.

Visit Recruit Vaughan’s page and read about his journey

Find out about joining the Army

Find out about ATR Winchester

You’re in the Army now: up close and personal with Ex FINAL FLING

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

My name is Andrew Vaughan, I am 25 years old and this is my story so far. I have just finished my twelfth week of Phase 1 training at ATR Winchester where I hope to go on to join the Royal Artillery.

 

Week 12

Monday

After a morning kit check we donned our bergens, boarded the coach and set off for Salisbury Plain for Ex FINAL FLING!

Once there, we made a quick stop to cam up and then tabbed to the harbour area. We were briefed on where we were to set up sentries as this was to be a linear harbour area as opposed to the triangular one we are used to adopting.

Then the fun part – digging our shell scrapes. We spent the next few hours digging a hole suitable enough for 2-3 recruits to comfortably fit into, which was harder than we expected due to the vast amount of tree roots present in the area. Eventually though, our shell scrapes were deep enough and work routine came into effect.

 

Gas attack unleashed

Before we could test out our new pits however, we were given a briefing on potential enemy in the area which is suspected of posing a CBRN threat. We got into the appropriate dress state and began our patrol. From a distance, we saw the enemy vehicle being intercepted by 1 Section; however as they tried to detain the enemy a gas attack was unleashed and less than nine seconds later our respirators were donned and purged. The enemy got away, and we patrolled back to our harbour area. We were later given a report that the CBRN threat had been neutralised and that we wouldn’t need to worry about it for the rest of the Exercise. Phew!

 

The training starts to kick in.

All the preparation starts to pay off

 

 

Tuesday

Morning routine and then we were given our first set of orders. We patrolled to a site where we were to later ambush the enemy’s supply route that evening. We planned how we’d go about it and then made our way back. On the way back however we were contacted by the enemy; we won the fire fight but had a casualty. After conducting our MIST report we CASEVACed our casualty back to the harbour area.

We spent our free time conducting personal admin and grabbing any sleep that we could. Once it got darker, we were given our orders and made our way back to the site previous and got into position. The ambush was set and ready. When the enemy supply vehicle came past they set off the trip flares we had set and we neutralised them in one swift blow. A quick check of the bodies and vehicle and we tabbed back to the harbour area for a debrief.

 

Wednesday

Morning orders to start with in which we were informed that enemy morale has dropped since our successful attack on the enemy supply vehicle yesterday which has resulted in the enemy not getting resupplied. Up next is a trip to the site where the main enemy HQ is supposed to be based. Instead of tabbing there however, we were to be taken by a Merlin helicopter!

"On the way back however we were contacted by the enemy"

“On the way back however we were contacted by the enemy”

 

We stood to, kept silent and got ready for a fire fight.

 

We waited for a while and then the helicopter made its approach. As it got close the ground, the force from the blades covered us in the surrounding grass and you can’t help but be impressed by its power. We made our way onto the Merlin and strapped ourselves in, myself being right next to the open side door. We took off and quickly picked up a huge amount of speed – I never realised how fast helicopters can go and also how much they can tilt! Absolutely loved it and had a huge grin on my face the entire journey.

Eventually we were dropped off not far from the enemy HQ. We kept low and looked for areas where we could spy on the enemy for tonight’s recce where we were to try and gain intelligence on the enemy. We found the perfect spot on a hill overlooking the HQ and then snuck away from the area. We had some lunch once we were far away enough from the enemy, regrouped with 3 Section and then went back to camp via a Chinook!

Back at the harbour area, instantly after I finished stag we were contacted by the enemy. We stood to, kept silent and got ready for a fire fight. We heard the enemy sneaking around the bushes directly by my basha and I braced myself. Eventually however the enemy backed off and we were stood down – just in time for me to go back on stag!

After scoff, we reapplied cam and used the cover of darkness to make our way to the enemy HQ. We took it in turns as pairs to make our way to the spot on the hill to use the CWS to spy on the enemy and note down their movements, appearance etc. An enemy vehicle was also roaming the area and a couple of times it’s light scanned the area we were in. Luckily we were completely camouflaged and didn’t move a muscle. Once we all had a good amount of information, we made our way back to camp without alerting the enemy. Success!

Thursday

Our orders today were to patrol an area where enemy vehicles have been spotted and to set up a VCP where we would hope to stop and detain the enemy. After a while of waiting, two individuals made their way down the road and we quickly went about trying to stop and question them. I convinced the one I was dealing with to let me search him and eventually after questioning him, he made a break for it and outran me. Embarrassing! Things didn’t go much better for the other guys either and the scenario was reset. It took a few attempts until eventually we were able to successfully detain suspects on foot and in vehicles.

Before we could head back to the harbour area, we saw that 3 Section had been contacted and we provided covering fire whilst they could make their way to us by which point we withdrew together. Once back we filled in our shell scrapes and covered up our presence there. We used the remaining time we had to get dinner and sleep on before our briefing from the Troop Commander on our all-out attack on the enemy tomorrow morning.

Friday

We woke up at 0000 hrs and our Troop Commander began to give us the plan of attack on the enemy HQ. The HQ consisted of three barns and our section were to attack the first barn and then provide fire support for the section attacking the next barn. During the briefing the wind picked up quite a bit but we ignored it. The briefing finished and we began to get ourselves ready. A bit of rain broke out but we ignored it. We checked each other over and got ourselves into patrol formation ready to move.

 

"It’s great to see how far we’ve come as a Troop"

“It’s great to see how far we’ve come as a Troop”

 

Then an all-out thunderstorm hit us.

We have had thunderstorms hit us on the last night of two exercises! Whilst some of the troop enjoyed the fact that we were now drenched for the final attack, I was not happy!

Despite the sudden weather change, we departed as a Troop to the enemy HQ. The way there was hard work with the weight on our backs but eventually we made it and set our bergens down. We quietly made our way into our relevant positions and waited for the signal to attack – mortar fire! At 0430 hrs the signal was given and our section made its attack! Our firing manoeuvres have never been better and we suppressed, approached and assaulted the enemy with no dramas at all. We kept up the momentum and quickly provided fire support for the other section as they too flawlessly neutralised the enemy. It’s great to see how far we’ve come as a Troop and how we were able to pull it out the bag when it mattered.

In what felt like seconds the battle was won. We made our way into an empty barn and were given a final debrief. That marked the end of Ex FINAL FLING and the end of exercises during Phase 1. A huge sense of relief washed over us and we went about collecting brass and cooking breakfast/cleaning rifles whilst waiting for the coach to arrive.

We got back to camp and made a start on cleaning our kit before finally crashing out in our own beds!

Saturday

Today I finished cleaning my kit and put my laundry in. I spent the rest of the day bulling my shoes in the Welfare centre whilst watching films. A lot more attention now needs to go into these shoes for pass out – in which I want them like glass!

Sunday

A long day of admin today. I cleaned the magazines and BFA used on Ex FINAL FLING, polished my boots, cleaned my lockers, ironed and folded my clothes, washed my body armour, mess tins, ear defence, mug and respirator. Made my bed, did my block jobs, brought new hangers and rehung my clothes to name a few tasks!

I didn’t stop from 0700 to 2200 hrs with things still to do! It’s amazing how quickly time flies when you’re having fun in the Army! Bring on Week 13!

 

Visit Recruit Vaughan’s page and read about his journey

Find out about joining the Army

Find out about ATR Winchester

You’re in the Army now: Preparing for Ex FINAL FLING

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

Recruit Andrew Vaughan.

My name is Andrew Vaughan, I am 25 years old and this is my story so far. I have just finished my eleventh week of Phase 1 training at ATR Winchester where I hope to go on to join the Royal Artillery.

 

Week 11

Monday

In the morning we got into our CBRN kit and headed to the gas chamber for 0800 hrs. We went into the chamber in details and carried out our CBRN test. This consisted of a full decontamination, followed by a drinking drill and changing our PFCs.

Climbing the wall

Climbing the wall

On my first attempt, I didn’t undo the straps on my respirator properly when taking it off and couldn’t put it back on. I tried and tried until eventually I ran out of air and inhaled a huge portion of CS. Thankfully I’m not as susceptible to its effects as others; however I still needed to leave the chamber. I went back in with another detail, learned from my mistake with regards to the straps and passed.

We got changed in rapid time and headed to the assault course to practise for the CO’s comp on Wednesday. It’s a lot harder with kit and rifles on but every attempt at the 12 ft wall showed improvement. Once back at camp, we grabbed our bergens and made our way to the same harbour area we used on Ex FIRST STEP. We had a firing manoeuvre test in pairs, which after a couple of hiccups I eventually passed. We set up our bashas, cleaned our rifles and got our heads down.

Tuesday

Reveille and straight into morning admin which we all needed to pass. A frantic hour and a half to get our rifles and ourselves squared away. When time was up I was inspected and other than some carbon on the gas block which I somehow missed, my rifle was deemed “pretty clean” and hopefully that means a pass.

We did some tests to check how much we had learned from previous exercises and also to prepare us for Ex FINAL FLING. Our Section Commander then went through the ‘Half Tac’ formation and also how to go about being contacted from different positons whilst in different patrolling formations. We also practised CASEVAC, focussing on changing carriers fluidly, which was where we struggled last time. Once all was done, we headed back to camp and packed our webbing for the kit inspection involved in the CO’s cup tomorrow.

Wednesday

Assault Course

Assault Course

We made our way to the Muster square and had our webbing checked by the Sergeant Major; all went well aside from some dirt on some of our water bottles. Damn!

After that we headed to the assault course where we had a nice gentle warm up ready for the course. Once we were suitably warmed up, we were off. We managed to get over the whole course without any dramas and was probably the best we’d done it yet. We adopted an all-round defence and got our breath back. After that, we picked up the stretcher and its 70kg passenger and again we were off. We kept a good pace, changed when needed to without any dramas, however we did eventually drop the stretcher twice due to poor changing. We powered through for the mile and eventually it was over. We finished off with a 25m shoot from the kneeling position which wasn’t too bad – although one member of our section had a stoppage and so scored no points!

Once back at camp, relieved that it was over we conducted admin and packing for our Phase 2 visit to Larkhill tomorrow.

Thursday

We woke up early and excited for our visit to our next home – Larkhill. After a 40 minute coach journey we arrived through the gates and were instantly impressed by how huge and pristine the camp is!

We had a presentation by the Battery Sergeant Major who spoke to us about our upcoming time in Phase 2 and was a good time to ask as many questions as we could. We had another briefing on the regiments and also on the restructure. It seems two of the regiments in my top three aren’t recruiting at the moment and so I’m now going to consider putting myself forward for 26 regiment – based in Germany!

We had a tour of the camp and then some scoff. I’ve always enjoyed the food here at Winchester but the food at Larkhill is even better! Definitely looking forward to meal times there. After that we had a tour on the different equipment the Artillery use and were given more information on the regiments that employ this equipment – all useful in helping us reach our decision in what to join.

Overall a very good, informative day. Once back at camp we received our kit list for Ex FINAL FLING and began to pack.

Team work on the assault course

Team work on the assault course

Friday

First up today was PT where we tackled some outdoor circuits. It’s now been a while since we had a heavy PT session and the warm up itself tired most of us out! The main session involved bear crawls, crab walks, push ups, sit ups, squats and running. By the end of the session three of our Troop puked!

Afterwards was a grenade lesson so that we‘re allowed to use them on Fling. Then we had the results of the COs cup. 1st, 2nd and 3rd place all went to 5 Troop. Congratulations 5 Troop!

We commiserated our loss with a charity curry lunch and then a briefing on how to enter/exit a Chinook and Merlin helicopter. It seems we’re getting helicopters for Fling – buzzing!

Saturday

Today I went to Southampton for a bit of shopping before returning to camp and cracking on with administration. It’s weird how I now find ironing clothes and polishing boots relaxing.

Sunday

Spent the weekend packing for Ex FINAL FLING and enjoying a nice bit of normality before the crazy week ahead.

 

Visit Recruit Vaughan’s page and read about his journey

Find out about joining the Army

Find out about ATR Winchester